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  • My project. Need your help!

    Hey guys! I really really need your help.
    At the end of the year, a serious term paper is coming and I have to do research for this.
    The title of my project is “Borrowing in French as a reflection of intercultural interactions”
    I need your personal examples from your experience, when you connected with a representative of other countries (for a lond time maybe) or while reading foreign literature, social media, you started using words from other languages, thereby displacing words of French origin.
    If you do not have such experience, perhaps you know some stories and interesting facts.
    I want my work to be connected with modernity, so different words about the Internet, technologies, or today's jargons and etc. are welcome!
    I will be very glad if you help me
    Thanks!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Paral-leL View Post
    Hey guys! I really really need your help.
    At the end of the year, a serious term paper is coming and I have to do research for this.
    The title of my project is “Borrowing in French as a reflection of intercultural interactions”
    I need your personal examples from your experience, when you connected with a representative of other countries (for a lond time maybe) or while reading foreign literature, social media, you started using words from other languages, thereby displacing words of French origin.
    If you do not have such experience, perhaps you know some stories and interesting facts.
    I want my work to be connected with modernity, so different words about the Internet, technologies, or today's jargons and etc. are welcome!
    I will be very glad if you help me
    Thanks!
    European French has borrowed several words from English

    Mail for email
    Parking for parking lot
    Shopping for shopping
    Weekend for week-end

    I spent time in Alsace for a while and started using the Alsatian word teuf which means "party" as in to have a party.





    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by RogerCarmel View Post

      European French has borrowed several words from English

      Mail for email
      Parking for parking lot
      Shopping for shopping
      Weekend for week-end

      I spent time in Alsace for a while and started using the Alsatian word teuf which means "party" as in to have a party.




      Thank you very much, Roger! It is very interesting and valuable information for me

      Comment


      • #4
        Have to correct RogerCarmel, "teuf" is not Alsacian but "verlan" (which is a way to speak by reversing the syllables ina more or less accurate way of a word). Teug is the "verlan" (l'envers) of fête (fê+te = teu +f).

        As for borrowing words from other cultures... It actually depends. Most fo them will be from English nowaday, but there are words borrowed from arabic and from some parrt of the population only (like "wesh" that can be used as a greeting or kind of weird "taunt" somehow).
        There are words borrowed from latin as well like in Englihs : Et caetera, Advitam eternam... Else, there is some part of the population using Japanese words, mostly weeaboos that will borrow few words such as "kawai" (cute)...

        Finally, maybe some "borrowed words" can simply be the word from a regional language. A Breton can not speak the breton language but still using some words while speaking French. Unfortunately, I don't have much to say about personal experience as I try to speak a "pure" French (with the exception of latin words) and avoid as much as possible International or regional words.

        Comment


        • #5
          It's my teuf ...who invited you, Ô Great Sancta Lux?

          Canadian French uses different words for the 4 examples I wrote about earlier:

          Euro French (English) Canadian French

          Mail (email) Courriel
          Parking (parking lot) Stationnement
          Shopping (shopping) Magasinage
          Weekend (week-end) Fin de semaine.


          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by RogerCarmel View Post
            It's my teuf ...who invited you, Ô Great Sancta Lux?

            Canadian French uses different words for the 4 examples I wrote about earlier:

            Euro French (English) Canadian French

            Mail (email) Courriel
            Parking (parking lot) Stationnement
            Shopping (shopping) Magasinage
            Weekend (week-end) Fin de semaine.

            True, actually, in many ways, Canadian French is more French than the French used by people in France.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Sancta_Lux View Post

              True, actually, in many ways, Canadian French is more French than the French used by people in France.

              Well...yes and no. We have different anglicisms because we are surrounded by a sea of anglophones on this continent. Some of these anglicisms are: (Canadian French - English - European French)

              Windshield - windshield - pare-brise
              Bumper - bumper - pare-choc

              ...and we have words which are transliterated from English into French:

              Canceller - cancelled - annuler
              Lousse - loose - qui chambranle

              Over the last decades, there has been a trend towards eliminating the English forms from Canadian French but older people will still say nouns like windshield . Adjectives and verbs such as canceller / cancelle / cancellé, lousse / lousser and so on are here to stay and have been adopted as correct into the language.
              Last edited by RogerCarmel; 02-27-2019, 03:25 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Paral-leL View Post
                Hey guys! I really really need your help.
                At the end of the year, a serious term paper is coming and I have to do research for this.
                The title of my project is “Borrowing in French as a reflection of intercultural interactions”
                I need your personal examples from your experience, when you connected with a representative of other countries (for a lond time maybe) or while reading foreign literature, social media, you started using words from other languages, thereby displacing words of French origin.
                If you do not have such experience, perhaps you know some stories and interesting facts.
                I want my work to be connected with modernity, so different words about the Internet, technologies, or today's jargons and etc. are welcome!
                I will be very glad if you help me
                Thanks!

                I visited your profile and saw that you are Russian. To research your term paper, I suggest you google the following:

                Anglicismes fréquents

                Anglicismes sémantiques

                Anglicismes syntaxique


                This will give you some material about English words/terms/syntax adopted by French speakers. The same research could be done for Spanish, Dutch...Russian?!

                Good luck!

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