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Fake Dialogue Method - Language Learning

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  • Fake Dialogue Method - Language Learning

    The Problem

    Someone begins speaking to you in your target language and you freeze up. You know, or once knew, the right words to say and you absolutely want to put your knowledge to use, but your mind comes to a screeching halt. You begin to panic, and you stare blankly at the person across from you.
    The Solution

    The Fake Dialogue Method is one of my favorite methods when it comes to gaining “flexibility” in a new language. When I first started learning Portuguese, this was something I often did to help solidify my mental ties with the language.
    Get your notebook, a little motivation and a dictionary. It’s time to get started.
    1. Think of different situations that you might find yourself in when speaking your target language, such as ordering a coffee, asking for directions or simply introducing yourself, and pick one. Let’s go with introducing yourself.
    2. In your notebook, make a fake dialogue in your target language using the vocabulary and key knowledge that you want to recall when you meet someone new. It should look a little something like this. (Examples of key phrases will be marked in italics.)
    Me: Hello, my name is _______ . What’s your name?
    Stranger: My name is _______. Nice to meet you!
    Me: It’s nice to meet you too. Where are you from?
    Stranger: I am from _____. What about you?
    Me: I am from _____. How old are you?
    Things to Keep in Mind

    • Try to familiarize yourself with both the questions and the responses. If you know what to say but can’t understand what’s being said, the conversation won’t get very far! If you don’t know the phrases to ask to begin with, phrases like these are readily available throughout the internet, usually marked under the name making introductions.
    • Read these dialogues over and over aloud, and practice them with native speakers to help solidify the new knowledge.
    • At first, your dialogues may sound a bit robotic. This is completely okay. As you get more comfortable and flexible with the language, you can make the dialogues sound more organic and real.
    • Conversations are spontaneous and unscripted. This method will just help you feel comfortable in not-so-comfortable situations.
    End Result

    Now, when you find yourself making introductions with a native speaker, you’ll have the conversation scripted in your head and you won’t freeze up. You can predict what they will say and you’ll be ready for it!

    Good luck,
    Jeremy


  • #2
    Originally posted by jeremyyd48 View Post
    The Problem

    Someone begins speaking to you in your target language and you freeze up. You know, or once knew, the right words to say and you absolutely want to put your knowledge to use, but your mind comes to a screeching halt. You begin to panic, and you stare blankly at the person across from you.
    The Solution

    The Fake Dialogue Method is one of my favorite methods when it comes to gaining “flexibility” in a new language. When I first started learning Portuguese, this was something I often did to help solidify my mental ties with the language.
    Get your notebook, a little motivation and a dictionary. It’s time to get started.
    1. Think of different situations that you might find yourself in when speaking your target language, such as ordering a coffee, asking for directions or simply introducing yourself, and pick one. Let’s go with introducing yourself.
    2. In your notebook, make a fake dialogue in your target language using the vocabulary and key knowledge that you want to recall when you meet someone new. It should look a little something like this. (Examples of key phrases will be marked in italics.)
    Me: Hello, my name is _______ . What’s your name?
    Stranger: My name is _______. Nice to meet you!
    Me: It’s nice to meet you too. Where are you from?
    Stranger: I am from _____. What about you?
    Me: I am from _____. How old are you?
    Things to Keep in Mind
    • Try to familiarize yourself with both the questions and the responses. If you know what to say but can’t understand what’s being said, the conversation won’t get very far! If you don’t know the phrases to ask to begin with, phrases like these are readily available throughout the internet, usually marked under the name making introductions.
    • Read these dialogues over and over aloud, and practice them with native speakers to help solidify the new knowledge.
    • At first, your dialogues may sound a bit robotic. This is completely okay. As you get more comfortable and flexible with the language, you can make the dialogues sound more organic and real.
    • Conversations are spontaneous and unscripted. This method will just help you feel comfortable in not-so-comfortable situations.
    End Result

    Now, when you find yourself making introductions with a native speaker, you’ll have the conversation scripted in your head and you won’t freeze up. You can predict what they will say and you’ll be ready for it!

    Good luck,
    Jeremy
    Firstly, how about referencing where you you copy-paste shit from.

    I see what you have written copy-pasted straight from here...

    https://tr.verbling.com/articles/pos...ialogue-method

    Someone posting copy-pasted crap and making it appear as if it is from him/herself. That's what I call the fake teacher method.

    In any case the article is largely bullshit from a real learning or for that matter teaching perspective. Scripted/fake conversations are pretty much a staple of lower level language teaching - not something "mysterious" as the article somewhat dishonestly implies. These are merely the first step in the dialogue learning process. "For whatever reason", the article is highly deficient and skips the really important parts of this process.

    This is the element which for me demonstrates the incompetency of the writer of the article which the OP brazenly stole:

    [*]At first, your dialogues may sound a bit robotic. This is completely okay. As you get more comfortable and flexible with the language, you can make the dialogues sound more organic and real.
    No!!!! The student doesn't suddenly magically start producing more and more advanced accurate dialogues. That sort of dialogue is at a beginner level!!! The student is unlikely to even be able to get accurate subject-verb agreement with "to be".

    This is where real teaching comes in - taking a scripted dialogue and making students operate on elements of it in a productive and accurate manner. For example, getting pairs to talk about themselves using the script, swapping the student partners then getting each student to report the details of the previous partner that the student had to the new partner. Monitoring and fixing up the mistakes that come up - such as the subject-verb agreement with "to be" in the case of that dialogue - are all part of the real teaching process. This is the manner in which you get the student comfortable and making the dialogues "real".

    Just letting students learn by rote a script then "magically" producing with it merely results in the students themselves adapting the scripts almost always with grammatical and other errors, becoming productive with their adaptations and inevitably creating fossilised mistakes.

    If you are teaching ESL and are working with students properly - you have my undying gratitude You are not the cause of students who are nominally "advanced" producing very basic mistakes - such as subject-verb agreement with "to be" which have their roots in sloppy teaching methodologies such as the one copy-pasted in the OP.

    By the way, some of the best ever beginner/elementary level ESL teachers I've ever seen working were not native English speakers..

    Comment


    • #3
      Friends,

      I am not a teacher. But I use this. So because I am not a teacher, I might think there are BETTER ways. But if you are trying to help someone, this way might be better then NO help at all.

      I try to tell my students to think in phrases. practice those phrases. There are sets of things you always say in groups. Like much of above. I try to get them to practice these over and over, so they have trained there mouth and brain to stay them. And they sound natural.

      The internet is full of good ideas. (as you have found ). I have to agree with the person above, if you copy and paste, at least say soo..or include the link.

      Thank you for sharing, and trying to help.

      dr. Darrell of Michigan.

      Comment

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