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  • Want to help with a linguistics project??

    Hi everybody! I'm an American linguistics student, and I'm interested in the way people from other countries talk about their families! I would just need to know your language's words for mom, sister, brother, etc. (e.g. "mother" in Spanish is "madre"). Anybody want to help?? I would really appreciate it! I can offer friendship and help learning English in return! Thank you!

  • #2
    For Chinese:
    (1 is 1st tone, 2 is 2nd tone, etc. 0 is neutral tone.)
    Mom: 妈妈 ma 1 ma 0
    Dad: 爸爸 ba 4 ba 0
    Older Sister: 姐姐 jie 3 jie 0
    Younger Sister: 妹妹 mei 4 mei 0
    Older Brother: 哥哥 ge 1 ge 0
    Younger Brother: 弟弟 di 4 di 0
    There are no characters that I know of that represent simply "brother" or "sister."

    If you're going to do research on how foreign countries use their respective languages to talk about their families, is this a sociolinguistics project on how their labels for their family members reflects their societal attitude towards family and the home? If not, I can't think of another reason why you'd want to carry out such a project (if you wanted to relate the phonetics for different languages' morphemes for familial relations, that's already been done in general, unless you're focusing on an obscure part of a language family that likely can't be found on interpals.net). If you are carrying out a sociolinguistics project, you'd not only need to know a large swath of a language's words for many morphemes concerning family, but you'd need to do so for a wide diversity of languages as well.

    If you're simply trying to find any sort of relation in general as a linguistics student, it isn't likely you'll be able to find one. Better yet, ask your professor on research done on morphemes based on familial relations across a wide swath of languages, and expand on that. It doesn't appear to be that your project is particularly focused, nor that it's entirely thought out.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by nevera View Post
      Hi everybody! I'm an American linguistics student, and I'm interested in the way people from other countries talk about their families! I would just need to know your language's words for mom, sister, brother, etc. (e.g. "mother" in Spanish is "madre"). Anybody want to help?? I would really appreciate it! I can offer friendship and help learning English in return! Thank you!
      Hi Nevera, I'm Tri from Central Java, Indonesia. It's interesting yups. My country have more than 300 etnic with over 700 different languages

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      • #4
        Originally posted by nevera View Post
        Hi everybody! I'm an American linguistics student, and I'm interested in the way people from other countries talk about their families! I would just need to know your language's words for mom, sister, brother, etc. (e.g. "mother" in Spanish is "madre"). Anybody want to help?? I would really appreciate it! I can offer friendship and help learning English in return! Thank you!
        Isn't this stuff already well-known in linguistics?

        Perhaps a very and more interesting question would be unusual ways you refer to family members and how you use your native language to refer to other family members when speaking to them. What those things mean literally in your native language.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by aussieinbg View Post

          Isn't this stuff already well-known in linguistics?

          Perhaps a very and more interesting question would be unusual ways you refer to family members and how you use your native language to refer to other family members when speaking to them. What those things mean literally in your native language.

          Hi! Thank you for this very unhelpful response! Yes, of course this information is well-known in linguistics. As a matter of fact, if I really wanted to, I could just Google Translate it. But it's not merely the words themselves I'm interested in. I'm learning the semantic uses of kinship terms in different languages, and I need live data from a native speaker of a language I don't speak. So, if you're willing to contribute, by all means, let's get down to it. But if you're just going to mansplain my own project to me, then I'm very much uninterested.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Kalion_Enoch View Post
            For Chinese:
            (1 is 1st tone, 2 is 2nd tone, etc. 0 is neutral tone.)
            Mom: 妈妈 ma 1 ma 0
            Dad: 爸爸 ba 4 ba 0
            Older Sister: 姐姐 jie 3 jie 0
            Younger Sister: 妹妹 mei 4 mei 0
            Older Brother: 哥哥 ge 1 ge 0
            Younger Brother: 弟弟 di 4 di 0
            There are no characters that I know of that represent simply "brother" or "sister."

            If you're going to do research on how foreign countries use their respective languages to talk about their families, is this a sociolinguistics project on how their labels for their family members reflects their societal attitude towards family and the home? If not, I can't think of another reason why you'd want to carry out such a project (if you wanted to relate the phonetics for different languages' morphemes for familial relations, that's already been done in general, unless you're focusing on an obscure part of a language family that likely can't be found on interpals.net). If you are carrying out a sociolinguistics project, you'd not only need to know a large swath of a language's words for many morphemes concerning family, but you'd need to do so for a wide diversity of languages as well.

            If you're simply trying to find any sort of relation in general as a linguistics student, it isn't likely you'll be able to find one. Better yet, ask your professor on research done on morphemes based on familial relations across a wide swath of languages, and expand on that. It doesn't appear to be that your project is particularly focused, nor that it's entirely thought out.
            HI! Thank you for being incredibly unhelpful! While I SINCERELY appreciate your unsolicited advice, it doesn't really help me get to my goal. I need live data from a speaker of a language other than my own, to analyze for reasons far too cumbersome to detail here. Besides that, I have to practice collecting data, analyzing it, and writing about it. I'm sorry that YOU may not see the point in my project, but I do. If you're wiling to help beyond what you've already listed here, then fine. If not, go bother someone else.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by nevera View Post
              Hi! Thank you for this very unhelpful response! Yes, of course this information is well-known in linguistics.
              Just wondering why you're retreading there.

              Originally posted by nevera View Post
              As a matter of fact, if I really wanted to, I could just Google Translate it.
              Ummmm no. Google Translate doesn't do kinship stuff very well - particularly in languages with relatively small numbers of speakers.

              Just for fun I've checked out how it handles English to Bulgarian on kinship terms such as "uncle" or "aunt", something I'm quite familiar with. Total mess - which is kind of expected because the AI translation engine in Google translate is hitting some massive barriers as a general rule presently, like any other translation software, in terms of cultural context.

              Getting user input and choosing "the most frequent answer" is merely a kludge by Google to get past that problem by giving "the single most popular answer".

              Originally posted by nevera View Post
              But it's not merely the words themselves I'm interested in. I'm learning the semantic uses of kinship terms in different languages, and I need live data from a native speaker of a language I don't speak.
              OK, that's all you had to say.

              However, I'm sincerely hoping that you are not adopting elements of pseudo-intellectualist postmodern anthropology bullshit in your study.

              Originally posted by nevera View Post
              So, if you're willing to contribute, by all means, let's get down to it.
              You hadn't mentioned "native speaker" in your OP, but you go on to mention it later on. At this point, I guess my input would not generate authentic data as you presently have set up the project.

              Originally posted by nevera View Post
              But if you're just going to mansplain my own project to me, then I'm very much uninterested.
              First up, I haven't got you to do a chromosome test to determine who I'm speaking with prior to responding. So cut the "mansplaining" verbal masturbation crap. My response to your OP was merely on the content you had written. Your butthurt responses - both to myself and another poster who looks like he/she knows what they are talking about is most likely a reaction to the fact that you might not.

              Secondly, you are on a forum open to all to post. People can write and comment on things. Previously, others have elicited help on linguistics/philology type projects and there have been discussions about the reasons for doing the projects and so on. Now, instead of telling people to f* off in a highly convoluted manner, you should be very welcoming of the fact that people are willing to devote time to critiquing your project - something that the person supervising your project most likely has not. More on that later.

              Thirdly, you actually do tell us unwittingly that you really have got problems understanding what you are doing:

              Originally posted by nevera View Post
              I need live data from a speaker of a language other than my own, to analyze for reasons far too cumbersome to detail here.
              Statements like "for reasons far too cumbersome to detail here" are almost always copouts for an inability to summarise in one or two sentences what someone is doing in a research project. It is usually a sign that the person doing the research doesn't really have a good idea about what they are doing and that the project is not at all focused.

              Now, let me stress that this is most likely not your fault. The person who is supervising you it seems has green-lighted you to go off and do work on a research project without you understanding what you are actually doing. This person doesn't seem to have thought through what you were suggesting not has elicited from you that you have understood what you are doing.




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              • #8
                In Czech:

                Father: otec, táta
                Mother: matka, máma

                Son: syn
                Daughter: dcera

                Sister: sestra
                Brother: bratr

                Grandmother: babička
                Grandfather: děda, dědeček

                Uncle: strýc
                Aunt: teta

                Male cousin: bratranec
                Female cousin: sestřenice


                In Czech, we also have diminutives for a lot of words, family members including. For father - otec, this form would be: taťka, tatínek, similarly for mother - matka, it is: mamka or maminka.
                The usage of those diminutives for family members expresses affection for that person and it is very common within functional families.


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