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Unpopular opinions on popular/classic books?

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  • Unpopular opinions on popular/classic books?

    For instance, so many people recommended Fahrenheit 451 to me but I barely got through it because I just couldn't stand it. I don't know if it was the characters, or the writing style, or what, but I disliked it a lot.

    What is a book/s that you didn't like that it seems like everyone else did?

  • #2
    I think it really does depend on your reading tastes. Some Classics are truly amazing in all aspects (plot, characters, writing, timelessness of the subject matter) and some are considered as such because the author pioneered in a particular literary movement/era/genre or has put forth a great example of what that period constitutes.

    I read The Aeneid of Virgil and was just wasn't impressed with it. Found it rather dull and and Virgil sucking up to the Roman emperor was just a pain to read. Another book would be Journey to the Centre of the Earth; it was entertaining but I still couldn't quite get what the hype's all about.

    I think I'll also be adding most of the YA fantasy books in the past 10-11 years. There's a lot of them that are extremely popular but are so poorly conceived. I would have loved to read more books in this genre but the ones I've picked up are honestly just so discouraging.
    Last edited by AlbaInMandos; 12-18-2017, 07:51 PM.

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    • #3
      Moby Dick is regarded as one of America's great novels, however I hated it. It's has too many unnecessary details that weighs down the entire book. It's also unnecessarily depressing for its time.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Martin501 View Post
        Moby Dick is regarded as one of America's great novels, however I hated it. It's has too many unnecessary details that weighs down the entire book. It's also unnecessarily depressing for its time.
        Most classics written a century or more ago are annoying to read. Once transliterated into modern language, they come into their own and we can see them for the monuments they are. Some novels, such as Don Quixote de la Mancha also benefit from being abridged for the modern reader.

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        • #5
          This 3 books are very popular, or respected. I read both, and I didnt liked them:
          Yann Martel: Life of Pi
          Blindness by José Saramago,
          The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho.

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          • #6
            If everyone liked the same books bookshops would only need one shelf!!!

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            • #7
              To Kill a Mockingbird was pretty bland for me. It seemed like I was reading the beginning of the book all the way up to what was supposed to be the end. Glad most people liked it though.

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              • #8
                Everything that anyone ever liked has always sucked.

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                • #9
                  Victor Hugo makes me yawn - no kidding. It really does.

                  I didn't catch the train on Orwell's 1984. I tried and the theme was appealing but it didn't work. That was a while ago so maybe it's not lost for this one.

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                  • #10
                    I think a lot of you should actually finish reading the book before judging it. Seriously. A lot of writers have styles that either take a while to get used to or they tend to set the pace very slowly, but that usually doesn't take anything away from the book itself. I have a lot of books and writers that I absolutely despise, however I only made those conclusions after giving them a try.

                    But like I said, everything that anyone ever liked has always sucked. If a writer's work doesn't serve a cultural or an academic purpose, everything after that is very subjective. As an example, I found this list in an article from The Guardian:

                    https://www.theguardian.com/books/20...-the-full-list

                    And out of a 100 of those books, I personally think that only 2-3 books earned a place on that list. It seems to me that the person who wrote the article hasn't read many books in their life, but that didn't stop them from making a list of the best books of all time somehow.

                    "Classics" are only relevant in an educational sense, more or less. While it's true that some "classics" have captured so much essence that they are relevant to this day, that list itself is *very* short because doing something like that requires tremendous talent. It looks as if that the most common opinion is that if a book has existed for a hundred or so years, it becomes a classic. That doesn't make it a "classic", that makes it an "antique".

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by AdvancedGarbage View Post
                      To Kill a Mockingbird was pretty bland for me. It seemed like I was reading the beginning of the book all the way up to what was supposed to be the end. Glad most people liked it though.
                      The whole point was that Harper Lee gave us a lesson in race relations and social psychology.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Patafix View Post
                        Victor Hugo makes me yawn - no kidding. It really does.
                        >>>>>
                        Young Victor Hugo fell in love with a 70-year old French actress. Bit like when young Macron fell in love with his teacher? French people adore both of them.

                        Virginia Woolf's 'To the Lighthouse' was a great disappointment to me. I thought something was wrong with the way her narrative was written.

                        Charles Dickens 'Hard Times' was unpopular sentiment to many people. But I thought the storyline was well crafted.
                        Last edited by look4swissmiss; 01-04-2018, 12:44 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by cordlessbook View Post
                          I think a lot of you should actually finish reading the book before judging it. Seriously. A lot of writers have styles that either take a while to get used to or they tend to set the pace very slowly, but that usually doesn't take anything away from the book itself. I have a lot of books and writers that I absolutely despise, however I only made those conclusions after giving them a try.
                          Well, when you struggled through 100-150 pages there's no more pleasure in reading. Although I had a hard time with some books (especially big ones) but ended up enjoying them when I had more free time and less in my mind. Usually when I was home with long illness, big books were no longer a terror but the best of friends.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by RogerCarmel View Post

                            Most classics written a century or more ago are annoying to read. Once transliterated into modern language, they come into their own and we can see them for the monuments they are. Some novels, such as Don Quixote de la Mancha also benefit from being abridged for the modern reader.

                            Abridging any work - including classics such as Don Quixote - is criminal and if anyone reading such a work finds themselves thinking this, then perhaps it's not for them.. they can always stick to Facebook.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Patafix View Post
                              Well, when you struggled through 100-150 pages there's no more pleasure in reading. Although I had a hard time with some books (especially big ones) but ended up enjoying them when I had more free time and less in my mind. Usually when I was home with long illness, big books were no longer a terror but the best of friends.
                              It happens, but personally I just push through it. Unless the book is like 5-600 pages though, then I understand because that really is a big investment. But, you know, as a rule, even if the book seems like a waste of time, sometimes there's just one single page or a sentence that totally makes up for everything up to that point. It's just a matter of whether it's worth it to you or not.


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