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Why do people put question marks at the end of sentences that aren't questions?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Metoras View Post
    Lots of theories and suggestions, but I would love to hear an actual person who doing it saying why they do so.
    You still haven't told us where these people who are doing it are from

    Now, if they are self-taught in English to the point where they are making such fundamental basic mistakes with punctuation, then it is probably the case that they would not be writing on this forum...

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    • #17
      Originally posted by aussieinbg View Post

      >>>ed<<<Now, if they are self-taught in English to the point where they are making such fundamental basic mistakes with punctuation, then it is probably the case that they would not be writing on this forum...
      Previously, did anyone mention the UK's Plain English Campaign? Plenty of free exercises if you know where to look. Considered the 'gold standard for British English. Business literature approved by the PEC (at a price) carries the 'crystal clear' diamond stamp. 'Kinda pays for itself.'

      See https://www.plainenglish.co.uk/free-guides.html

      Last edited by look4swissmiss; 03-12-2019, 05:45 PM.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by look4swissmiss View Post

        Previously, did anyone mention the UK's Plain English Campaign? Plenty of free exercises if you know where to look.

        See https://www.plainenglish.co.uk/free-guides.html
        There are literally thousands of grammar/syntax guides out there on internet for English - whether it is British, American and even Australian.

        The thing is - even with these guides, if you don't have someone actively correcting you during your learning process then you are going to be making mistakes that look really weird to a native speaker. It's all about leveraging what you know in your native language or, if you have already learnt another/other language(s) when you are learning a new language, what you know from a previous learnt language.

        When in doubt while learning a new language, you use what you already know - grammar, punctuation, word usage and so on. This is especially true when you are trying to produce in speaking or writing what you have learnt in your new language.

        Unless you already "know how to learn a new language", you are probably not even going to check out the differences in such guides like the ones you have posted.

        Over a long period of time teaching people English at all levels, I've seen all sorts of mistakes from people who have been "self taught" in English - even in those who have highly functional English.

        I've also gone through the process in more than one language via "self teaching". Yes, I also make mistakes that look strange to a native speaker - that's in spite of knowing many of the tricks for learning a new language from having taught English as a second language for quite a few years now. It all comes down to this if you want to avoid making such mistakes - when learning a new language, try as much as possible to work with someone who knows that language and can spot the mistakes immediately so that you can fix them before they become fossilised.

        Also, what I've noticed is that those who are most critical of non-native English speakers and their mistakes often as not have never learnt another language themselves...

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        • #19
          Well, old boys and girls, we are supposed here to learn. Or at least few of us poor creatures who enjoyed only a little bit school english.


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          • #20
            Originally posted by Hades91x View Post
            Well, old boys and girls, we are supposed here to learn. Or at least few of us poor creatures who enjoyed only a little bit school english.


            The real fun grammar Nazis are those who criticise everyone else for "poor grammar" but they themselves are making huge numbers of mistakes

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            • #21
              Originally posted by aussieinbg View Post

              The real fun grammar Nazis are those who criticise everyone else for "poor grammar" but they themselves are making huge numbers of mistakes

              Well, I can't judge that in english
              but in my mother/father languages is this behavior that you describe sometimes observable. Especially on Individuals who prefer rude escalation instead of an objective discussion with other people.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Hades91x View Post
                Well, I can't judge that in english
                but in my mother/father languages is this behavior that you describe sometimes observable. Especially on Individuals who prefer rude escalation instead of an objective discussion with other people.
                I'm not such a bad judge of it in English. The really fun one to watch as a spectator sport is American verses British English

                But seriously, a couple of grammatical mistakes is not going to make much of a difference to the overall picture if your thoughts when speaking/writing are well structured.

                Even if you have 100% "perfect" grammar, your writing/speaking will still be shit if your thinking/support is a total mishmash.

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