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Environmental interference - examples that have affected migration in your country?

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  • Environmental interference - examples that have affected migration in your country?

    Last year, I spotted eagles and kites refusing to leave Malaysia for Northern Australia, enticed by chicken scraps. This year it's grey herons refusing to leave southern UK, enticed by American signal crayfish. Should we be told what else have you seen?

  • #2
    Weather has a lot to do with it. Cold weather of course drives some birds to migrate. And they are the harbinger of bad weather following closely on their tail as they fly south. Here the key birds are Robins and a variety of black birds that are the bearers of bad weather. But we also have a growing population of geese that stay south now all year.

    your post referenced food. I can't think of any good example locally.
    I can picture in my mind a world without war, a world without hate. And I can picture us attacking that world, because they'd never expect it.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Lavite View Post
      Weather has a lot to do with it. >>>>edited<<<your post referenced food. I can't think of any good example locally.
      ​Disruption by in human interference ? Yes I suppose weather falls into that category.

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      • #4
        Sources of consumption for wildlife animals has reduced in Indian forests & biospheres as well, off-course due to human intervention. And yes, Animals do retaliate.For example, elephants can travel a long distance to rural or tribal villages in search of their grain-stocks. And controlling them is a huge task. Sometimes the get killed by railways or electric cables.

        Mostly angry or mad elephants are males. They are either controlled by large drum noises and fire. If not possible, then lured through female domestic elephants to deeper forest. Female elephants goes crazy if their babies are lost/killed.
        Last edited by RoyofSupratik; 01-13-2017, 05:40 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by RoyofSupratik View Post
          Sources of consumption for wildlife animals has reduced in Indian forests & biospheres as well, off-course due to human intervention. And yes, Animals do retaliate.For example, elephants can travel a long distance to rural or tribal villages in search of their grain-stocks. And controlling them is a huge task. Sometimes the get killed by railways or electric cables.

          Mostly angry or mad elephants are males. They are either controlled by large drum noises and fire. If not possible, then lured through female domestic elephants to deeper forest. Female elephants goes crazy if their babies are lost/killed.
          ​Thanks for sharing. Human disruption to elephant behaviour didn't occur to me. So, very well done for that!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by look4swissmiss View Post
            Last year, I spotted eagles and kites refusing to leave Malaysia for Northern Australia, enticed by chicken scraps. This year it's grey herons refusing to leave southern UK, enticed by American signal crayfish. Should we be told what else have you seen?
            Nature is bin weird since, i began my job. Just small things,like plants coming up or blooming in the wrong season, same with the animals, ect.

            Watching the change in birds migration(geese,swans,ect)..............but also insects surviving.............ect.

            Things are changing, thats for sure.................still pondering about the human effect/naturale cycle....

            Mzzls

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            • #7
              Mallards are pretty interesting to observe in Finland, as some of them depart for warmer places and some stay. Despite the harsh winter climate that makes them appear quite miserable, the ones that stay behind apparently have a significantly better survival rate than the migratory ones.

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              • #8
                Sparrows have decreased drastically in my country. Last time I saw them in my 90s childhood. They had to stay within human society to earn food.

                The rapid changes in the lifestyles of humans in urban areas are increasingly incompatible with the conservative lifestyles of sparrows

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by RoyofSupratik View Post
                  Sparrows have decreased drastically in my country. Last time I saw them in my 90s childhood. They had to stay within human society to earn food.
                  ​Yes that's an easy one to answer because they are edible. Guess which country only has inedible birds left?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by -Lauri- View Post
                    Mallards are pretty interesting to observe in Finland, as some of them depart for warmer places and some stay. Despite the harsh winter climate that makes them appear quite miserable, the ones that stay behind apparently have a significantly better survival rate than the migratory ones.
                    ​I saw an abundance of butterflies in Helsinki botanic garden during September. These were three species of butterflies missing from UK. Finland must have had warm weather during 2016.

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