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  • Religious education

    If you had a time slot - at school or outside - dedicated to religious education, what did it consist of ?
    Did you study the big books directly, or learned through songs, comics,...?
    Was there room for discussion, questions ?
    What kind of activities or events were organised around that religious education ? (pilgrimage, visit of museums, churches or other holy places, retreats)

    Whether you are still religious or not, how useful did you find that education in your path ?

  • #2
    Full religious education is only for the elite, because religion is a lot of money. We can see attempts of clerics to be implemented in the school to infiltrate the minds of children.

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    • #3
      It consisted of workbooks that took pupils through the entire Protestant Bible guided by a Bible teacher. In addition, we used the KJV Bible for verse memorization. Lastly, every Wednesday, the entire school went to Chapel where a pastor gave a sermon and we sang songs.

      As much room as going to a private Christain school would allow. In six years, I never heard a question fail to receive an answer. Parents paid a considerable sum and understood that it was a Protestant Christian school. The Catholics that attended understood where they were and never asked why Catholic practices were not observed and taught. No Jews or Muslims attended. A few Sikhs and Hindus attended, but they did what everyone else did. Their parents likely wanted them away from public schools.

      Considering my alternatives, it was useful. It helped teach me the world's leading religion, manners, obedience, and conformity. Some may think obedience and conformity are negative things; however, they are useful in society because one will need to obey and conform to a society if one wishes to succeed in it. Moreover, it kept me away from less desirable youth and the vices that entail from them. The school did a very good job at providing a safe environment.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Patafix View Post
        If you had a time slot - at school or outside - dedicated to religious education, what did it consist of ?
        Did you study the big books directly, or learned through songs, comics,...?
        Both, when I was younger it was songs, prayers, comics etc. later it included also Bible work

        Was there room for discussion, questions ?
        Yes, but the answers to those questions were often frustrating and/or wrong

        What kind of activities or events were organised around that religious education ? (pilgrimage, visit of museums, churches or other holy places, retreats)
        We went to church 4-5 times every year.

        Whether you are still religious or not, how useful did you find that education in your path ?
        I don't regret it and sometimes it is still useful. The biggest advantage for me was that I was confronted with it enough to abandon Christianty. But I guess that was not the goal of my teachers

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        • #5
          Originally posted by dmitri11 View Post
          Full religious education is only for the elite, because religion is a lot of money. We can see attempts of clerics to be implemented in the school to infiltrate the minds of children.
          Then I guess I was part of the elite... I went to a Roman Catholic school so I got a good, classical education. Look that up if you don't know what it means...and you public school kids probably don't have a clue... LOL

          Anyway, I was raised an atheist, so none of that religion poisoned my mind. However, I can see that few of you (atheists and theists alike) know anything when it comes to the Bible. Your understanding of hermeneutics and escatology is woefully inadequate so it's usually best to keep your mouth shut...

          So...I have the pride and haughtiness of typical atheists except that I know what I'm talking about. That's what my RC education gave me.



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          • #6
            I am self-taught from reading the Bible and the history of that time period. I was originally an atheist and into evolution but ended up siding with Christianity and God as the best answer to the mystery of life.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Dark-Matter View Post
              I was originally an atheist and into evolution but ended up siding with Christianity and God as the best answer to the mystery of life.
              Try red wine.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by -Lauri- View Post
                Try red wine.
                Why? .

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dark-Matter View Post

                  Why? .
                  Don't bother with him. He's a typical atheist: doesn't have a clue about what he's talking about.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Patafix View Post
                    If you had a time slot - at school or outside - dedicated to religious education, what did it consist of ?
                    Did you study the big books directly, or learned through songs, comics,...?
                    Was there room for discussion, questions ?
                    What kind of activities or events were organised around that religious education ? (pilgrimage, visit of museums, churches or other holy places, retreats)

                    Whether you are still religious or not, how useful did you find that education in your path ?
                    I got catechesis every saturday at my elementary school, it was about studying some texts, some stories, songs, prayers... We were going to the church once in a while too, but that was rare. We also had some event to prepare to the first communion, for the ones who wanted. I don't remember there was a lot of discussions.

                    To be honnest, I didn't pay much attention to that and already found it boring... But I think I got some interesting knowledge like the mythology or some principles from Catholicism, not everything is good or bad in a religion.
                    Oh, yes, I also learnt that the communion wafer is disgusting because incredibly tasteless.

                    Originally posted by Dark-Matter View Post

                    Why? .
                    Tolerance was speaking I guess.
                    Last edited by Sancta_Lux; 07-07-2017, 12:13 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Religious education was a great time to practice debating skills against utter bullshit dogma.

                      Some years later, one of the other people in that once a week session thanked me for putting her on the road to becoming an Atheist. So religious education classes weren't a complete waste of time

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sancta_Lux View Post

                        I got catechesis every saturday at my elementary school, it was about studying some texts, some stories, songs, prayers... We were going to the church once in a while too, but that was rare. We also had some event to prepare to the first communion, for the ones who wanted. I don't remember there was a lot of discussions.

                        To be honnest, I didn't pay much attention to that and already found it boring... But I think I got some interesting knowledge like the mythology or some principles from Catholicism, not everything is good or bad in a religion.
                        Oh, yes, I also learnt that the communion wafer is disgusting because incredibly tasteless.


                        Tolerance was speaking I guess.
                        The wafer was my favourite time towards the end of my religious education, it meant it was almost over and we would have a proper "apéro" right after I found it digusting at first too. But in the end I would have enjoyed a couple more. Sunday mass was typically a hungry time for me.

                        I had religious "lessons" at church and in a parish house from 7 to 12 I think. We had several priests of the area as teachers. The main one was a notorious pervert (and probably more) but the other ones were fine, only a bit cold. Occasionally some old bible bashing spinster. I remember early lessons were very boring and we were so lost that they started updating their methods. It was much like school, learning by heart and reciting lines and prayers. We studied a comic about the life and passion of christ, drawings were basic but it was a bit more entertaining.

                        They also organised a youth club, which I liked because we'd go on day trips out of Paris, visit churches and other religious places in the country, and play all afternoon. It was an all-boy group, I knew most of them from school or neighbourhood. Only the main priest would wear "normal" clothes on these trips.

                        We had a two-day retreat in a small castle near a forest. We discussed about what we learned and how to confront it with society as it was then. I had an interesting chat with two priests although there were conservative answers that didn't match they way I saw things. The holy communion had something strange and powerful, we'd have evening mass before Easter and there was a special atmosphere in it. It didn't prevent me from quitting the "system" - while more than half of the group went to be confirmed.

                        It taught me about relationships with my little friends and adults but I wasn't convinced by the books and moral education stuff. I quickly forgot everything I learned. My father was a bit disappointed, he was a very straight man and couldn't really understand the next generation and evolution of society in general.
                        Last edited by Patafix; 07-07-2017, 01:26 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Patafix View Post
                          The wafer was my favourite time towards the end of my religious education, it meant it was almost over and we would have a proper "apéro" right after I found it digusting at first too. But in the end I would have enjoyed a couple more. Sunday mass was typically a hungry time for me.

                          I had religious "lessons" at church and in a parish house from 7 to 12 I think. We had several priests of the area as teachers. The main one was a notorious pervert (and probably more) but the other ones were fine, only a bit cold. Occasionally some old bible bashing spinster. I remember early lessons were very boring and we were so lost that they started updating their methods. It was much like school, learning by heart and reciting lines and prayers. We studied a comic about the life and passion of christ, drawings were basic but it was a bit more entertaining.

                          They also organised a youth club, which I liked because we'd go on day trips out of Paris, visit churches and other religious places in the country, and play all afternoon. It was an all-boy group, I knew most of them from school or neighbourhood. Only the main priest would wear "normal" clothes on these trips.

                          We had a two-day retreat in a small castle near a forest. We discussed about what we learned and how to confront it with society as it was then. I had an interesting chat with two priests although there were conservative answers that didn't match they way I saw things. The holy communion had something strange and powerful, we'd have evening mass before Easter and there was a special atmosphere in it. It didn't prevent me from quitting the "system" - while more than half of the group went to be confirmed.

                          It taught me about relationships with my little friends and adults but I wasn't convinced by the books and moral education stuff. I quickly forgot everything I learned. My father was a bit disappointed, he was a very straight man and couldn't really understand the next generation and evolution of society in general.
                          The "apéro" after was, indeed, very attractive

                          I had only a nun as teacher in Ce1, in addition, I lived close to a house full of nuns (don't rememeber the name), was raised partially by a religious grandma and got visited a lot by her sister, another nun, and spend a lot of time in a mate's house which has a religious family too... They were all very nice, especially my teacher, though she pulled my ear once or twice, and the mother of my mate (which still worry about me when I meet her). I think I got enough religious education with them, and though I'm not religious myself, I note that they are from the kidest people I have met in my life. They personally never forced me to learn any prayers or to study bible, so I'm glad with that.

                          I don't remember of any club or retreats, I think my generation was already far more less religious (90'/00'), but I would have enjoyed a retreat near a forest and a conversation or a debate with some priests for sure.

                          I don't think my family or anyone around me got disappointed because of my lack of faith, or I wonder what are their thoughts about my sister who is a real atheist, while, on my part, I only don't care about the existence or the nonexistence of a supernatural thing.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Sancta_Lux View Post

                            I don't think my family or anyone around me got disappointed because of my lack of faith, or I wonder what are their thoughts about my sister who is a real atheist, while, on my part, I only don't care about the existence or the nonexistence of a supernatural thing.
                            The next time you meet your sister, tell her you've become a Buddhist and offer to light a sacred candle to purify her spirit.

                            (Try to keep a straight face while doing this.)


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                            • #15
                              I think religious education should always be a choice. I've heard in Germany parents were punished for not allowing their kid into a mosque which would never ever happen here - we have a choice, kids can either choose ethics or religion and everyone is OK. Some families wish their kids to be taught religion, some don't. No one forces kids to go to churches if they do not wish to do so.

                              My kid chose to study religion, first because he was not sure if he was religious or not then because he liked the teacher lol and he told me they used to have interesting lessons where they learnt about beliefs that exist, about ethic norms, they used to learn to discuss things, the lessons simply broadened students' horizon rather than pushed any religion onto them. Finally my kid had decided he was not religious but never said anything bad about such lessons at school. If the lessons pushed certain indoctrinations (like leftist one in Germany making kids go to a mosque) parents and kids would protest.

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