Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Any Physics majors or anyone working in Quantum?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Any Physics majors or anyone working in Quantum?

    Searching for experiences of physics/quantum physics majors. I had a few questions on a quantum wave function. Thanks~.

  • #2
    Quantum Wave function? As in the Schrodinger Equation describing a specific physical system?

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, specifically that...and its relations. I had a question on the wave function~.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by dontclickonthis View Post
        Yes, specifically that...and its relations. I had a question on the wave function~.
        What do you mean by "and its relations"?

        More context to the problem would be nice. I'm not a mind reader.

        Comment


        • #5
          Oh, yes. The actual question is somewhat conceptual.
          What's the primary difference between a classic harmonic oscillator and a quantum harmonic oscillator? The energy levels in a quantum harmonic oscillator relate to a wave function in what way?
          Thanks.

          Comment


          • #6
            Here is the answer. The difference between quantum and classical harmonic oscillator.
            https://cmm.cit.nih.gov/intro_simulation/node3.html

            Comment


            • #7
              If you wanna know more about quantum mech, wave functions, hamiltonian, energy eigenstates, hermite polynomials, etc you need to check the academical open courses. You can search on MIT's open course ware. Also if you wanna buy a book, choose Griffiths's quantum mech book

              Comment


              • #8
                The nature of your question regarding classical and harmonic oscillators, which has been immediately been answered by Petrichoria, seems to me to indicate that you are probably a bit of a beginner at Quantum.

                Wikipedia (surprisingly or not) has some very good articles on Quantum. I don't know what your maths is like, or whether you are into bra / ket notation aka Dirac or not, but this article gets a bit more technical about quantum harmonic oscillators:

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantu...nic_oscillator

                and gives you a good technical rundown on it.

                Griffiths' book is a pretty standard text on quantum mechanics.

                Another one I'd recommend is The Feynman Lectures in Physics Vol. 3. This is the volume in the series dealing with quantum mechanics. Rather than providing mathematically heavy solutions of the Schrodinger Equation with probability amplitudes and so on, it approaches the topic from a highly descriptive and physical viewpoint.

                I'd recommend reading it because of its physical emphasis and also that Feynman is simply a brilliant and expressive writer who did not just make statements but supports them completely.

                It's over 50 years old, but hasn't really aged much (except for bits and pieces of the English, but that's OK). You can find it all over internet in pdf format. I've just taken a look on amazon for prices and you might pick up a 2nd hand copy for $10 onwards.

                Comment


                • #9
                  you can find all this book for free just send me a msg to tell you )))))

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Drimar View Post
                    you can find all this book for free just send me a msg to tell you )))))
                    I think it is very easy to find the PDFs for this (or for that matter even recordings of the lectures). Even if you find "The Feynman Lectures on Physics" on torrent sites or whatever, I'd still recommend getting a physical copy of the book.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X