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  • European Identity

    I read this article http://www.dw.com/en/macedonia-whats...ame/a-42450141, and I was curious how Europeans indentify. For example, I am from the US. Growing up, I was told I am German. I spoke to a German man one time, and he said, "You are not German. You are an American. If you lived in German, that is who you would be to them." I am an American of European decent. My last name is Dutch / German. I speak English. I am not half this or that; I am a complete human being. Dunno

  • #2
    Originally posted by _loki View Post
    I read this article http://www.dw.com/en/macedonia-whats...ame/a-42450141, and I was curious how Europeans indentify. For example, I am from the US. Growing up, I was told I am German. I spoke to a German man one time, and he said, "You are not German. You are an American. If you lived in German, that is who you would be to them." I am an American of European decent. My last name is Dutch / German. I speak English. I am not half this or that; I am a complete human being. Dunno
    Definitely there is more identity of this or that European country not that much "European". EU is trying to force the "European identity" thing, but it doesn't work

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jordan_rudess View Post

      Definitely there is more identity of this or that European country not that much "European". EU is trying to force the "European identity" thing, but it doesn't work
      I see it more as a whole due to my mixed European ancestry. But I understand Europe is divided linguistically, yes?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by _loki View Post

        I see it more as a whole due to my mixed European ancestry. But I understand Europe is divided linguistically, yes?
        Divided linguistically, culturally and economically. Western Europe is more liberal, Eastern is more conservative, for economic differences please compare average wage in Ukraine and Switzerland.

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        • #5
          i mean i dont understand how a european identifies with the shifting borders. that is why i mentioned europe being divided linguistically: that the current borders follow linguistic patterns

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          • #6
            Originally posted by _loki View Post
            i mean i dont understand how a european identifies with the shifting borders. that is why i mentioned europe being divided linguistically: that the current borders follow linguistic patterns
            I don't really know what you mean by "identifying with the shifting borders". The borders are only open since enacting The Schengen Agreements (1995) and before that everyone was just sitting in his own country. The passport was required to travel from one European country to another.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jordan_rudess View Post

              I don't really know what you mean by "identifying with the shifting borders". The borders are only open since enacting The Schengen Agreements (1995) and before that everyone was just sitting in his own country. The passport was required to travel from one European country to another.
              maybe i can find an article about what i am talking. but for the mean time, take Kalingrad for an example. are they russian now or something else?

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              • #8
                Well, there are surely some things Europeans have in common, which differ from the US (I mean, it's often seen as "the western world" altogether, but it's not the same). E.g. the most Europeans don't understand why Facebook doesn't show any pictures with nudity - I don't mean porn pics, but pics where possibly a part of female breast is not fully covered. In Europe, sometimes one can see bare breast women on a normal beach (not a nude beach), and no one cares.

                Then I think in Europe it's more common to touch each other - e.g. when a colleague, who works in a different location and we didn't see him or her for a long time, comes to the office, we hug each other (dunno if it's common in the US, but I think it's less common).

                Then I think (but maybe it's more for middle and eastern Europe), the equity of men and women is more natural here. Girls go to a college and become doctors or engineers not because they want to be so modern and liberated, but just because they know what they want to become in the future. I think in the US, it's still about being liberated (but maybe it's no more nowadays).

                Then the weapon thing: In the US it's a basic right to care a weapon, and people are more likely to use it. In Europe, you can buy a weapon, but (depending on the country) you must at least prove that you are mentally healthy and not previously convicted, sometimes even substantiate why you need it, and the weapon must be registered.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by _loki View Post

                  maybe i can find an article about what i am talking. but for the mean time, take Kalingrad for an example. are they russian now or something else?
                  Of course they are Russian, why wouldn't they be. They preserve Russian language and culture, they are subject to Russian administration system and Russian laws

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                  • #10
                    By “shifting borders” Loki probably means that the borders of such countries as France, Germany and Poland (and others) have changed several times since the early 1900s. Poland even disappeared as a country under the Third Reich.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RogerCarmel View Post
                      By “shifting borders” Loki probably means that the borders of such countries as France, Germany and Poland (and others) have changed several times since the early 1900s. Poland even disappeared as a country under the Third Reich.

                      I don't know about other countries by in Poland change of borders happened together with relocation of citizens.
                      Last edited by jordan_rudess; 06-13-2018, 10:53 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jordan_rudess View Post

                        Of course they are Russian, why wouldn't they be. They preserve Russian language and culture, they are subject to Russian administration system and Russian laws
                        i think if i were a German living in konigsberg, i would not be happy of the soviet union annexing the territory and changing the name to kalingrad. i wouldnt suddenly start waving the russian flag during soccer games.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by _loki View Post

                          i think if i were a German living in konigsberg, i would not be happy of the soviet union annexing the territory and changing the name to kalingrad. i wouldnt suddenly start waving the russian flag during soccer games.
                          Believe me Soviet Union had very efficient ways of dealing with the unhappy citizens. Even more, soviet union (as well as any commies in general) was actively seeking for the "enemies of socialism" just to murder them, deport to Siberia, or imprison for life

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jordan_rudess View Post

                            Believe me Soviet Union had very efficient ways of dealing with the unhappy citizens. Even more, soviet union (as well as any commies in general) was actively seeking for the "enemies of socialism" just to murder them, deport to Siberia, or imprison for life
                            That's true, I'd rather Germany, not the shitty USSR had the Baltics as their zone of influence...East Germans also lived under commies but no one can beat USSR....No matter we have difficulties as a country now but no mother soviet Russia denationalizes and kills us any more...Threatens our security but we're off the game, luckily....The happiest day for many of us was the collapse of the shitty soviet dictatorship called USSR.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jordan_rudess View Post
                              Divided linguistically, culturally and economically. Western Europe is more liberal, Eastern is more conservative, for economic differences please compare average wage in Ukraine and Switzerland.
                              And biologically*


                              I agree with jordan, there is no European identity but European identities. If you really need a tip to divide Europe into different identities, you can follow historical borders of historical regions/countries, even if some lost their identity it can provide a good idea of how Europe is culturally wide.

                              For example, you claim to be German but just in Germany, you could be Bavarian, you would have your own history, your dialect and in some extent your features. Generally, everything is kinda graduated and you don't see a marked difference on the borders, if you go to France and go to Paris or to Strasbourg, you would see a difference in the accents at least. If Alsacians start to speak Alsacian (and despite regional language had been kinda destroyed in France) you would see that the Parisian is a pure French while the Alsacian is a mix between french and german and has even more to do with German culture than with french in many ways.

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